If you’re a rugby player from Pontypridd, a netballer from Nantymoel, or a canoeist in Colwyn Bay, then lockdown might have taken the edge off your fitness, so here’s the perfect chance to see if you can help your kids tame the Dragon.

There are dozens of different games and skills to master here on the Sport Wales website.

Just go to:

https://www.sport.wales/media-centre/latest-news/2020-04-21-sport-wales-makes-education-resources-available-during-lockdown/

If you think your efforts deserve a wider audience, or just want to share the fun of being physical during lockdown, then post your clips on social media, using #BeActiveWales.

One of the brains behind the programme is educationalist and leadership coach Jan English who initially developed the games for children to use in schools.

But with the current lockdown affecting the vast majority of schools in Wales – and few kids getting their normal fix of physical activity – the Dragon challenges are now available for every child and parent in their own home.

“When we used them with schools, nursery settings, playgroups and all those things, everybody just loved them,” says Jan.

“But if anything, in the current period then they are more relevant than ever. They’re not just about sport. People are home-schooling, they are looking for activities they can do in the house, and if you’re a mum and you’re wanting to keep children active with fun activities then these are perfect.

“These are games in a quick and easy format. You don’t need much equipment, other than what you would have in the house, and you can be as creative and imaginative as you like.

“It would be great if people have fun, challenge each other and put their efforts online so that families and friends can share and be part of it.”

So, there’s Myths and Legends – involving taggers and dodgers – Dragon Egg Hunt – comprising a makeshift obstacle course – and others all aimed at seven to 11-year-olds.

Then, there’s Dragon’s Dance, Jumping Jade and Pebble Plop for the three to seven-year-olds.

Pebble Plop involves throwing objects into a bucket, while Jumping Jade will have you leaping across a mighty river.

As these activities were originally meant for schools groups, the illustrations and some suggestions involve larger groups of children than might currently be found in most family units.

But they can all be adapted for smaller groupings and don’t involve any need to go beyond immediate family members, which might threaten social distancing restrictions.

“The games are able to be played as a version that would only involve pairs or parents and children together,” says Jan.

“They can be adapted and we’re certainly not looking for people to go beyond their household members.

“But it would be great if people stepped up to the challenge and got involved. I wonder how the Welsh rugby captain might so at some of these, or Welsh footballers or netballers, or Welsh musicians or TV people, or even the First Minister, Mark Drakeford?”

So do we.